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Rustic Colorado mountain home offers refined contemporary interiors

rustic-entry

This elegant expression of a modern western style home combines a rustic regional exterior with a refined contemporary interior, located in Cherry Hills Village a suburb of Denver, Colorado. Encompassing 9,000 square feet of living space, this home was designed by architecture studio Ekman Design Studio with interiors by Comstock Design and constructed by Cadre General Contractors.

The homeowner’s private art collection is embraced by a combination of modern steel trusses, stonework and traditional timber beams. Generous expanses of glass allow for view corridors of the mountains to the west, open space wetlands towards the south and the adjacent horse pasture on the east.

rustic-exterior

Above: The siding is a stained cedar board and batten. The stone is from Telluride Stone Company, Rico Stack, full veneer. The metal roof was a standard bronze color from the manufacturer. The lantern is a custom fabrication per the architects design (the rendering can be found by continuing to scroll to the end of this article).

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Above: The windows are the Sierra Pacific ‘Estate’ series, aluminum clad and painted in a dark bronze finish to match the exterior cladding of the window. The ceiling is Douglas Fir, tongue and groove. The ceiling light fixtures are the Relativity Large Lantern Pendants by Fine Art Lamps, found here. The metal ceiling trusses were designed by the architect and custom fabricated.

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Above: The furniture and fabrics were sourced through Comstock Designs in Denver. The ceiling finish is an applied surfacing material sourced from Maya Romanoff. The ceiling fixture is by Baker Furniture, Morris Ribbon Pendant No. CE102.

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Above: Steel posts and “flitch” plates were used to support the roof and the lateral wind loads. For window treatments, there are motorized shades hidden in the trim.

contemporary-kitchen

What We Love: Showcasing exquisite custom details throughout, this beautiful mountain home is warm and inviting. From its rustic exterior, this home is very approachable, opening up to a contemporary interior. The heavy use of stone and wood on both the exterior and interior helps to add a cozy feel; while the home’s surroundings creates a peaceful atmosphere, which is invited inside thanks to large windows throughout.

Readers, what do you think of the design of this home, could you imagine yourself living here? Is there anything you would prefer to have been done differently? Tell us in the Comments below!

contemporary-living-room

Above: The material going through the Zebrawood fireplace surround is a patina steel. There is a large stone surround between the firebox and the wood trim. The shade of green on the accent wall is a custom color by Benjamin Moore. The bookshelf lights are the Thomas O’Brien David 18″ Art Light in Bronze with Hand-Rubbed Antique Brass by Visual Comfort TOB2019BZ-HAB, sourced from Foothills Lighting & Supply.

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Above: In the hall, the wood panels are a zebrawood veneer plywood.

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Above: The staircase was custom designed. Material: 1/4” steel bar stock and 5/8” round tube steel.

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Above: The glass tiles on the wall of the powder bathroom is by Unique Building Concepts.

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Above: The railings in this house were custom designed and fabricated locally in Denver. The wood used in this house is Douglas Fir.

contemporary-pool

Above: The spa is 8’x10′ and accommodates 6-8 people. The pool dimensions are 18′ x 50′. Ekman Design Studio designed the pool, spa and fountain and Colorado Pools completed the installation.

Photos: Ron Ruscio Photography

You are reading an article curated by: https://onekindesign.com/

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Jub

It seems that when you climb from the first stair and want to go to the second stair, you can’t turn right, you have to turn left then go throw a room maybe then you can access the second stair… How irritating it must be in the usual life… Does architects ever live in the houses they build ?