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This stunning industrial modern refuge has breathtaking Seattle skyline views

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Janof Architecture designed this industrial modern refuge with the primary goal of fully embracing the breathtaking panoramic views found on Seattle’s Queen Anne Hill. Despite working within a modest budget for a family with two young children, the architects managed to create a 5,663-square-foot dwelling that not only fulfills the owner’s desire for a tranquil domestic retreat but also amplifies the surrounding natural beauty.

From the street, the front of the house maintains a traditional facade that blends harmoniously with the neighborhood’s character. However, on the opposite side, the rear elevation showcases a striking modern design characterized by expansive glass surfaces.

To seamlessly integrate the home with the hillside, the architects ingeniously embedded two gabled, bearing-wall “houses” deep into the hillside. These contain rooms requiring enclosure, effectively concealing them from view and providing the house with a conventional street-facing appearance that aligns with the neighborhood’s aesthetic.

The interiors were designed to create a warm and welcoming environment for family living and entertaining. The project’s innovative structural expression garnered well-deserved recognition, earning a National Certificate of Recognition from the American Institute of Steel Construction.

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The budget required basic construction using off-the-shelf parts. Rigorous but un-precious detailing followed. The greatest technical effort went into the design of the two-story window wall: residential wood windows assembled as a true curtain wall.

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Above: The kitchen is a warm and functional space, with custom-designed walnut cabinetry, stainless steel, and extra-thick Calacatta marble countertops.

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Above: Adjacent to the kitchen is the breakfast nook, which provides an eclectic feel and commanding city views. The mural was created by the homeowners specifically for the space.

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Above: The dining room features soaring 19-foot-high ceilings, designed for spectacular nighttime views of the city.

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Above: The exquisite powder bathroom room gets its charm from the custom wallpaper designed by the homeowners.

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What We Love: This industrial modern refuge offers plenty of incredible details throughout. The standout feature is the dining room with its double-story steel and glass window… the views are nothing short of spectacular! The home office is also fabulous, it makes working from home a treat with that incredible view

Tell Us: What do you think? Could you work from home if you lived here? Share your thoughts in the Comments below!

Note: Have a look at another home tour that we have featured here on One Kindesign from the portfolio of Janof Architecture: Refreshing update to an historic log home in the Seattle suburbs.

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Above: The master bedroom offers remarkable views and has been made cozy thanks to the incorporation of a fireplace and subtly concealed lighting.

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Above: This elegantly designed master bathroom features Callacatta and Carrera marble and polished nickel fittings.

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Above: The home office boasts fabulous city and water views; light further penetrates this space via a small dormer window above the desk.

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Sustainability: The energy efficiency of the house was designed around the passive use of its southern orientation, with high-performance glass, cross-ventilating windows, and precisely calculated overhangs making air conditioning unnecessary this summer. The winter sun will bring warmth deep into the house, and the industrial-size fan above the dining room is designed to slowly move air throughout the house.

While the house meets the Energy Star rating, much thought went into what sustainability means. There is no bravura use of natural resources. Structural elements are sized at their calculated minimums. Precious materials were used sparingly, often where they would be touched by the user, and salvaged material was valued for its patina.

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Above: The steel-framed “glass box” occupies the view facade of this home.

Photos: Benjamin Benschneider

site and roof plan

first floor plan

basement level plan

second floor plan

east-west section

north-south-section

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AName
6 months ago

This is stunning

KrissyB
6 months ago

Stunning home in one of my favorite cities! Love everything about this, especially the dining room and the front door. I would guess their idea of a “modest” budget and most people’s idea of a modest budget are not the same. LOL

TT
6 months ago

Love this! I want the powder room wallpaper.

Josh
6 months ago

Seattle + lotsa glass.