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Modern waterfront property boasts small footprint in Port Washington

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This fabulous 1,500 square foot modern waterfront property was designed by Narofsky Architecture in collaboration with interiors studio ways2design. The residence is set into a hillside in Port Washington, a hamlet on the North Shore of Long Island, New York. The site was formally occupied by an old bungalow colony. Established over 80 years ago, the homes were eventually torn down and replaced with more contemporary properties. Some homes were designed to be more respectful of their surroundings, as this particular home was.

Above: In the living room, sliding glass doors opens this space up to its waterside location, blurring boundaries between indoors and out. Set in front of a sleek fireplace is a comfortable sectional called the “Link Sofa”, sourced from Suite NY. The swivel chairs were sourced from Poltrona Frau.

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The flooring is a poured in place, self-leveling concrete with a secondary pour wear top layer. The architects had radiant heat installed throughout the interiors, so the poured in place concrete was the perfect selection for not only the design but the construction process.

The small footprint of the home allowed there to be no seams in the concrete. Also, the elasticity of the material enabled it to be poured without expansion gaps. Even though there is some cracking, which the architects anticipated, it was also appreciated due to the overall aesthetic.

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What We Love: This modern waterfront property showcases clean lines and ample use of wood, creating warm and inviting interiors. The design of the architecture is elegant and understated. We love how the homeowners respected the site and built a home that is perfectly integrated into it’s hillside setting… Readers, what are your thoughts?

Have a look at another home tour we have featured here in the past from the portfolio of Narofsky Architecture + ways2design: Ultimate bachelor penthouse loft in Manhattan.

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Above: The laminate kitchen cabinetry is by Poggenpohl, called “teak lava”. The Morph Stools were sourced from Suite NY. The steel superstructure is infilled with reclaimed timbers that were sourced from New York City brownstones.

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Interesting Fact: This residence won the 2011 AIA Archi award from the Long Island Chapter.

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Above: The waterfront property also features a fabulous green roof, designed by Xero Flor America.

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Above: The homeowners requested a simple structure that respected both the hillside and its environment.

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Photos: Phillip Ennis Photography

You are reading an article curated by: http://onekindesign.com/

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  • Mary Jo

    This 1,500 sq. ft. is my kind of living. I am a minimalist, excess of anything is a waste. Thank you for sharing.

    • One Kindesign

      Hi Mary Jo, agreed! Large homes are fun to look at, but smaller homes are much more cozy to live in. Happy to hear you enjoyed this home.